Spruce Up Your Furniture By Making It Look Older Than It Already Is!

Spruce Up Your Furniture By Making It Look Older Than It Already Is!

Seriously, isn’t that a crazy idea?  It’s funny how we don’t do that to our face or bodies.  :)  The worn look is totally in, and it can be achieved quite easily.  It works to our advantage, too! This trick can even update un-stylish, worn out, or damaged furniture that doesn’t have much to offer in the way of uniqueness.

What you need:

Optional: Brown Paint (If you already have brown furniture, you won’t need this.  Also, it doesn’t matter what color this is.  It doesn’t have to be brown.  Black is nice, too. This is the color that is going to show through the top coat – that looks like the scuffs/old accents.

Sandpaper:  Grade of 300+ ….. or be creative. Do you want more scuffs & marks?   Go for it!

A candle:  It is for accenting.  Don’t buy one – look for scrap in your house. I’ve used a stick that was half way burned down, a fat candle that got melty in a car, and even a box of birthday candles that had odd & ends from various birthdays……

Paint: The Main Color You Want to See;  This project has an aqua color.

Optional:  A finishing lacquer:  If it’s going to be a high-traffic area, seal it.  If it’s not, who cares.

antiquing furniture med 1

Here we are. An old dresser that’s already brown.

antiquing furniture med 2

Sand it.

antiquing furniture med 3

Sometimes I’ll drag the candle on the flat surfaces, too.

antiquing furniture med 4

Paint it. Good News: Mistakes & ugly strokes are welcome!

antiquing furniture large final

After dry, sand away the places you put wax. Clear varnish if desired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Sand the whole thing really well.  Sand off especially grimy spots.

2. Optional: Paint it brown if it’s not brown.  Or black, or whatever you chose…(If you have to paint it, you’ll have to sand again after it’s dry)

3. Go over all the embellishments, corners, etc. with the side of your candle.  This is acting like a barrier for the topcoat. I like to go deep into the imperfections, to – - but maybe you want a different, look with less imperfections. It’s up to you.

4. Paint it the color you want. Let it dry completely.

5. Sand all the areas where you used wax.  The paint will chip off & leave those lines, embellishments, etc. exposed – showing the brown.

6. Optional: Topcoat if desired – with finishing lacquer – clear  varnish.

 

Do this on small wood projects, stools, picture frames…… anything!

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